Head and Brain

Services
People
News and Events
Other
Blogs

E-Scooters may be legalised

View profile for Malcolm Underhill
  • Posted
  • Author
E-Scooters may be legalised

In the summer of 2020 we saw the rollout of the use of is scooters. It is still only permissible to use rental e-scooters on public roads, in a number of pilots across the country, although the Government’s Transport Committee is now recommending that the use of e-scooters on roads should be legalised. This recommendation comes with surprising speed bearing in mind the safety concerns that have been raised.

E-scooter Pilots

Under the pilot scheme introduced in Middlesbrough, Milton Keynes, Northampton, Birmingham and Coventry, the e-scooters have a maximum speed of approximately 15 miles an hour. It is important that restrictions on speed continue as whilst e-scooters may be seen as a bit of fun, there are serious risks if the e-scooters are not used properly. It has recently been announced that police will carry out spot checks on scooters to prevent them from being used on payments or driven by drunks. Those attending will be subject to a fine and points on their licence.

Introduction of e-scooters needs to have safety as a top priority

Middlesbrough became the first town in the country to trial e-scooters, hoping to ease the pressure on the country’s gridlocked roads.        A Department for Transport spokesperson has now said, “We welcome the outcome of the Committee’s report today (2 October 2020) and believe that e-scooters can offer an affordable, reliable and sustainable way to travel. Safety will always be our top priority and our current trials are allowing us to better understand the benefits of the scooters and their impact on public space, helping us to design future regulations”.

Thankfully the safety concerns are recognised by the Transport Committee. They have described riding e-scooters on pavements as “dangerous and antisocial” and that when the use of e-scooters is legalised across the country, that the current law should continue, to “prohibit their use on pavements”, with “robust enforcement measures” implemented.

The chairman of the Transport Committee, Huw Merriman said, “E-scooters have the potential to become an exciting and ingenious way to navigate our streets and get from place to place. If this gets people out of the car, reducing congestion and exercising in the open air, then even better. We need to ensure that their arrival on our streets doesn’t make life more difficult for pedestrians, and especially disabled people”.

Over the last few months we have seen a number of incidences reported, which highlight the danger around the use of a scooters.  Therefore it is imperative that prior to the legalisation of the general use of e-scooters, full account is taken of all the trials which have so far been implemented and are due to be extended over the coming months, to ensure that lives and livelihood are not put at unnecessary risk.

IBB Claims personal injury lawyers have considerable experience to help and advise on all types of compensation claims, including those arising from road traffic accidents. We offer a free initial consultation so we can get a clear understanding of your situation and give a realistic assessment on your prospects of bringing a compensation claim.

Contact our personal injury experts.

IBB Claims personal injury lawyers have considerable experience to help and advise on all types of compensation claims, including those arising from road traffic accidents. We offer a free initial consultation so we can get a clear understanding of your situation and give a realistic assessment on your prospects of bringing a compensation claim.

For a commitment-free initial advice, call us today on 0333 123 9099. Alternatively, you can email us at enquiries@ibbclaims.co.uk or use the contact form on the right to request a call back.

The information contained within our Blog Articles is provided as general information only. It does not constitute legal or professional advice or seek to be an exhaustive statement of the law and should not be relied on or treated as a substitute for specific advice relevant to particular circumstances. For further details, please see our terms of use policy.