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Catholic Church Criticised over Response to claims of Sexual Abuse

View profile for Malcolm Underhill
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Catholic Church Criticised over Response to claims of Sexual Abuse

The Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales has been criticised for its response to claims of childhood sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) has recently published a report criticising the leadership of the Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Vincent Nichols, and the Vatican.

The report from the IICSA reports that between 1970 and 2015 there were 931 allegations or concerns of child sexual abuse made by 1753 individuals, against clergy, members of religious institutes and lay workers, which involved over 3000 instances of alleged abuse by 936 alleged perpetrators.         A separate report shows that the Roman Catholic Church still receives, on average, over 100 allegations of child sexual abuse per year.

In its condemnation of the response by the Catholic Church in England and Wales, to allegations of child sexual abuse, the IICSA say that the Church “focused too often on the protection of the clergy and the Church’s reputation”. They state that some institutions and individuals failed to report allegations and concerns to police and statutory authorities, as they were required to do. Furthermore, and outrageously, in some cases, members of the dioceses and religious institutes actively took steps to shelter and shield those accused of child sexual abuse. This was done at the expense of protecting children.

The Church did not consider the risks that perpetrators presented. Those perpetrators were seen as colleagues, brethren and friends, rather, then as should have been the case, as sexual abusers of children. In some cases, suspects were moved from one institution to another, from parish to parish, abbey to abbey. The authorities were not informed. In short, there was an internal cover-up by the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales, which was more concerned about its own reputation, then the lives of innocent and vulnerable children.

These behaviours are wholly unacceptable and we need to see a radical change in the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales, at all levels, to ensure that those who are responsible for safeguarding do, in every single case, put the welfare of children first and well above the interests of individuals and institutions.

In the meantime, we, at IBB, will continue to pursue claims for Catholic Church abuse compensation, from those institutions and individuals who treated children with such utter contempt. They must pay for their sins.

No amount of money can make up for the devastating and often lifelong impact on the victims and survivors of Roman Catholic Church childhood sexual abuse, but it can help individuals address the continuing symptoms and importantly, enabling them to obtain access to specialised mental health treatment. The compensation can also address other consequences of Catholic Church child sexual abuse.

Contact our abuse claims experts today

At IBB, our personal injury team has the expertise and knowledge to advise and represent you if you wish to seek compensation for Catholic Church Sexual Abuse. To talk about how we might be able to help, please phone us on 0333 123 9099, email us at enquiries@ibbclaims.co.uk or fill in our contact form.  Any discussions you have with us will be in the strictest of confidence.

The information contained within our Blog Articles is provided as general information only. It does not constitute legal or professional advice or seek to be an exhaustive statement of the law and should not be relied on or treated as a substitute for specific advice relevant to particular circumstances. For further details, please see our terms of use policy.

The information contained within our Blog Articles is provided as general information only. It does not constitute legal or professional advice or seek to be an exhaustive statement of the law and should not be relied on or treated as a substitute for specific advice relevant to particular circumstances. For further details, please see our terms of use policy.